Nadal isn't planning on making changes after loss to Thiem in Madrid

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Rafael Nadal lost to Dominic Thiem in Madrid, but he is still the player to beat in Rome. (AP)

Rafael Nadal doesn't plan to make any big changes following his quarterfinal defeat to Dominic Thiem at Madrid, staying with the playing style that has helped him dominate the clay-court season again.

The Spaniard came in having won a record 50 consecutive sets on clay, but fell in straight sets—his first defeat on the surface since Rome in 2017, where he was also taken down by Thiem in the quarterfinals.

Still, the No. 2 will not be questioning himself as he returns to Rome this week.

"I don't have to do a lot of things different," he told press at Madrid. "I won 50 straight sets on this surface.

"So I can't go back to the hotel and think that I have to do a lot of things different to prepare the next events because will not be something that will be very smart for my part."

"I just have to analyze what's going on and just going to try to play with more determination, to be more aggressive," he added.

WATCH—TC Live on Nadal extending clay winning streak to 50 sets: 

That will include, as usual, looking at statistics with coach Carlos Moya about the depth, angle and accuracy of his shots during the week.
 
"We just have a look at it. We see where we have positioned the balls," he said during the week. "We look at all of those things because we know more or less when I am playing well, [it's] one of the things I do."

But Nadal also said during Madrid that he was not especially concerned about fatigue during a stretch that has seen him play the Davis Cup quarterfinals followed by four events in five weeks.

"Physically, no," he said. "I haven't played any match to three sets.

"Of course, there's always mental tiredness. I have to be focused every day."

Nadal began the ATP clay-court season with back-to-back titles at both Monte Carlo and Barcelona before playing Madrid.

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