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Each day, we'll preview three must-see matches from Roland Garros.

Iga Swiatek vs. Anett Kontaveit

Who should be favored: the defending champion, or a player who leads the head to head 2-0? Swiatek has won 18 straight sets at Roland Garros; she stormed through the tournament without surrendering one last fall, and she has won both of her matches this year in straights. She’s also coming off an impressive title run in Rome last month, capped with a 6-0, 6-0 win over Karolina Pliskova. But Kontaveit looked just as good in her last match, a 6-2, 6-0 win over Kristina Mladenovic—and she has won both of her previous meetings with Swiatek.

Is this where the Pole’s run of perfection in Paris ends? The answer will rest squarely on her racquet. If she’s on, she should win; if she’s not, Kontaveit is more than capable of taking advantage of the lapse. Winner: Kontaveit

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WATCH: Daniela Hantuchova with Daria Abramowicz, Iga Swiatek's psychologist.

Coco Gauff vs. Jen Brady

One is 17, the other is 26, but both can be described as up-and-coming Americans, because both are still getting better. Brady reached her first Grand Slam final at the Australian Open this year, while Gauff has made strides with her serve, her shot selection, and her ability to finish matches this spring. The teen is coming off her first clay-court title run, in Parma. Brady won her only previous meeting with Gauff, on hard courts in Lexington last year. Who will have the edge when they play the final match on Lenglen on Saturday?

Gauff is a nonpareil defender, which may give her an advantage on clay. And Brady barely escaped in her last match, over Fiona Ferro, 7-5 in the third set. But Brady is a superb athlete herself, with more experience in the later rounds at Slams. I’ll take her attack over Gauff’s defense, in a squeaker. Winner: Brady

(For more on the betting angle of Gauff vs. Brady, read today's The Pick.)

Roger Federer vs. Dominic Koepfer

Is playing the night session at Roland Garros this year a good thing or a bad thing? On the one hand, as the last match going, the whole world is watching you; on the other, no one is cheering for you inside Court Philippe Chatrier. The 39-year-old Federer and the 27-year-old Koepfer will take over that silent stage on Saturday.

They’ve never faced each other, which means that Koepfer is likely to be a little nervous going up against his living-legend opponent to start. On the plus side, he’s a lefty, which means his forehand might trouble Federer’s one-handed backhand. And Koepfer is nothing if not a fighter. But Federer, to the surprise of many, has looked a lot like Federer so far in Paris. That should be enough. Winner: Federer

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Coco Gauff vs. Jen Brady

One is 17, the other is 26, but both can be described as up-and-coming Americans, because both are still getting better. Brady reached her first major final at the Australian Open this year, while Gauff has made strides with her serve, her shot selection, and her ability to finish matches this spring. The teen is coming off her first clay-court title run, in Parma. Brady won her only previous meeting with Gauff, on hard courts in Lexington last year. Who will have the edge when they play the final match go in Lenglen on Saturday? Gauff is a nonpareil defender, which may give her an advantage on clay. And Brady barely escaped in her last match, over Fiona Ferro, 7-5 in the third set. But Brady is a superb athlete herself, with more experience in the later rounds at Slams. I’ll take her attack over Gauff’s defense, in a squeaker. Winner: Brady

Roger Federer vs. Dominic Koepfer

Is playing the night session at Roland Garros this year a good or a bad thing? On the one hand, the whole world is watching you; on the other, no one is cheering for you inside Court Philippe Chatrier. The 39-year-old Federer and the 27-year-old Koepfer will take over that silent stage on Saturday. They’ve never faced each other, which means that Koepfer is likely to be a little nervous going up against his living-legend opponent to start. On the plus side, he’s a lefty, which means his forehand might trouble Federer’s one-handed backhand. And Koepfer is nothing if not a fighter. But Federer, to the surprise of many, has looked a lot like Federer so far in Paris. That should be enough. Winner: Federer