WATCH: Andy Murray's press conference after his five-set, second-round win.

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Garbiñe Muguruza vs. Ons Jabeur

Is Muguruza getting that 2017 feeling again? That year, seeded 14th at Wimbledon, she built up a head of steam through the first week that eventually brought her the title. So far in 2021, as the 11th seed, she has dropped just six games in her first two rounds. The only problem is that the woman she’ll face in the first match on Centre Court on Friday has been almost as good. Jabeur has dropped eight games in two matches, and she blanked five-time champion Venus Williams 6-0 in the second set. Muguruza edged Jabeur in their only meeting, 7-6 in the third, on a hard court in Hobart last year. The second meeting, on the game’s biggest stage, promises to feature an intriguing contrast: Muguruza’s straight ahead power against Jabeur’s seemingly arbitrary finesse shots. I’ll take Muguruza, because she has been here and won here before. Winner: Muguruza

Dan Evans vs. Sebastian Korda

Korda is tennis royalty, but the 20-year-old’s opportunity to play in front of the royal box on Centre Court comes courtesy of his opponent, Evans, one of Britain’s few remaining home-country heroes. Korda has never played Wimbledon, or Evans. Does he have a fighting chance against a much more experienced opponent, who will have 15,000 people in his corner? Yes. Evans has a greater variety of shots, and greater knowledge of the grass game. But Korda has a bigger serve and ground strokes, and he’s looked comfortable on turf so far. The question may come down to whether Evans is buoyed by the crowd, or made more nervous but it. Korda will win many more times in Centre Court in the future, but he may have to chalk this one up to a learning experience. Winner: Evans

Murray will need to be at his very best to withstand Shapovalov's power.

Murray will need to be at his very best to withstand Shapovalov's power.

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Denis Shapovalov vs. Andy Murray

It’s a measure of how long it has been since Murray was on the tour full-time that he has never played the 22-year-old Shapovalov. Their first meeting will be a big one, last up on Centre Court, where Murray loves to be more than anywhere else. The first thing Shapovalov may want to do is tone down his traditional post-winner roars and post-error shrieks. They could get on the locals’ nerves. But other than the setting, Shapovalov should feel good about this matchup. He’s the guy with the bigger serve and forehand. He’s the guy who’s 12 years younger. He’s the guy whose career is on the upswing. And he’s not the guy who, like Murray, finished a four-hour five-setter at nearly 11 P.M on Wednesday; Shapovalov got a walkover in his second-round match. I’d like to think Murray can use all of his experience, and his supporters, to find a way to win, but logic says Shapovalov will have too much left in the tank for him. Winner: Shapovalov