Twenty of the Bryan brothers' most extraordinary accomplishments

Twenty of the Bryan brothers' most extraordinary accomplishments

For one, they’re the only doubles team to win all four Grand Slams, all nine Masters 1000s, the ATP Finals and the Olympics.

The most successful men’s doubles team in history, the Bryan brothers, announced on Wednesday that 2020 will be their final season on tour. To commemorate the occasion, here are 20 of the many, many achievements Bob and Mike have accomplished in their combined careers—along with what records have yet to be set.

1. They’ve won a record 16 Grand Slam doubles titles. Six Australian Opens, two French Opens, three Wimbledons and five US Opens. In 2018, Mike won two more Slams, with Jack Sock, at Wimbledon and the US Open, which gives him the individual record for most Grand Slam men’s doubles titles.

2. They’ve won a record 118 doubles titles. That’s almost twice as many as the next team on the list: Todd Woodbridge and Mark Woodforde—the Woodies—who won 61 titles together.

3. They’ve won more doubles titles than anyone else individually. Mike and Bob are first and second place for most individual ATP doubles titles with 123 and 118. Daniel Nestor is next with 91.

4. They have a record 1,102 career match wins. Their team record is 1,102-358. They’re also in first and second place for most individual doubles match wins: Mike has 1,144; Bob has 1,103.



5. They’ve spent more weeks at No. 1 than any other doubles team in tennis history, male or female. They’ve spent 438 of those weeks co-ranked No. 1 with each other; respectively, Mike has been ranked No. 1 for 506 weeks, and Bob for 439 weeks. No other player has cracked 400 career weeks at No. 1.

6. They’ve finished 10 seasons as the No. 1 doubles team. The Bryans were the year-end No. 1 doubles team in 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014. That’s twice as many No. 1 finishes as the next team on the list, the Woodies.

7. They have the most individual year-end No. 1 doubles finishes, too. With 10 and 8, respectively, Mike and Bob both lead the next player on the list, John McEnroe, who finished a season No. 1 on the ATP doubles rankings three times.

8. They’re the only men’s doubles team in the Open Era to hold all four Grand Slams at the same time. They won four in a row between the 2012 US Open and 2013 Wimbledon—and had also won gold at the 2012 London Olympics in 2012.

9. They’re the only men’s doubles team in the Open Era to win every Grand Slam twice. The Woodies came close, having won multiple titles at every Grand Slam except for Roland Garros.

10. They’re the first doubles team to win all nine ATP Masters 1000 events. The Bryans completed the nonet by with their 2014 Shanghai title.

11. They’ve qualified for the ATP Finals a record 18 times. No other player has qualified for the ATP Finals in doubles more than 15 times. The Bryans also have the most career doubles match wins at the ATP Finals: Mike is 42-25; Bob 38-24.

12. They’re the only doubles team to win all four Grand Slams, all nine Masters 1000s, the ATP Finals and the Olympics. Daniel Nestor has also done it. Novak Djokovic is only missing one piece of the puzzle, and he can complete the set next year if he wins gold at the Tokyo Olympics.



13. They’ve reached a record 30 Grand Slam finals together. That’s twice as many as the next team on the list—you guessed it, the Woodies—which reached 15.

14. They’ve won 11 Grand Slam mixed doubles titles between them. Bob has seven mixed doubles titles, while Mike has four. They’ve played each other five times in mixed doubles matches, with Bob leading the series, 3-2.

15. They were the first brothers to win more than 10 ATP doubles titles together. The Gullikson brothers won 10 ATP doubles titles together, but the Bryans have shattered that, winning 118 tournaments.

16. They’re one of three teams of brothers to win a Grand Slam doubles title in the Open Era. Gene and Sandy Meyer won the 1979 French Open, and Luke and Murphy Jensen won the 1993 French Open.



17. They won at least one Grand Slam title every year over a 10-year stretch. They’re the only men’s doubles team to accomplish this, which happened between 2005 and 2014.

18. They’re one of only two teams in the Open Era to reach all four Grand Slam finals in a season. The Bryans did so in 2005, winning the US Open and finishing runners-up at the other three majors. Mahesh Bhupathi and Leander Paes did it in 1999, winning the French Open and Wimbledon.

19. Mike Bryan is the oldest No. 1 in ATP rankings history, singles or doubles. The 40-year-old made it to the top of the rankings on July 16, 2018.

20. They’re one of only two men’s doubles teams in history to have won a Career Golden Slam. The only other team to achieve the feat is the Woodies, which won gold in Atlanta in 1996.

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Are there any doubles records the Bryans haven’t broken?

They’re extremely hard to find, but there are a few, including most career titles at the ATP Finals. Their total of four is second to Peter Fleming and McEnroe’s seven. The Bryans could have gone tried for No. 5 at this year’s ATP Finals, but they elected to end their season after the US Open.

Also, while Mike holds the all-time individual record for most Grand Slam men’s doubles titles, with 18, Bob is tied for third place with 16, alongside Roy Emerson and Todd Woodbridge, and sitting behind John Newcombe’s 17. Bob missed three Grand Slams in 2018 due to a hip injury that eventually required surgery; it was during that period when Mike won his other two majors alongside Sock.

And while both Bryans did extremely well in mixed doubles, neither of them hold the record for most mixed majors. Leander Paes holds the Open Era men’s record with 10, while Owen Davidson holds the all-time record with 11.