Vasek Pospisil on the challenges of being an ATP Player Council member

Vasek Pospisil on the challenges of being an ATP Player Council member

“It’s difficult,” Pospisil said on Thursday’s edition of Tennis Channel Live. “Just like anything, when you bring a new approach or try to change something in a big way, there will be guys [who] support that and guys that are against it.”

Vasek Pospisil is in a tough spot. As a member of the ATP Player Council, he is responsible for relaying crucial information about the state of the men's tour and it’s future plans (think ATP/WTA merger) to the players he represents.

But sometimes the information discussed between the ATP's executive board and the player council is confidential. So how does Pospisil balance the unenviable position of dispersing certain information while oftentimes not even having all the details himself?

“It’s difficult,” Pospisil said on Thursday’s edition of Tennis Channel Live. “Just like anything, when you bring a new approach or try to change something in a big way, there will be guys [who] support that and guys that are against it.

“I think the true difficulty in my position when relaying information to the players is that they don’t necessarily have all the information they need to come to a conclusion on the matter, and the problem is a lot of times I don’t even have some of that information. And a lot of times when I do, that information is confidential. It’s difficult to have a strong opinion when you don’t have all the information.”

Some players, like Nick Kyrgios, have conveyed a firm point of view on the matter.

Pospisil responded to Kyrgios’ statement during a Wednesday interview on TSN. 

“A lot of people in general will express an opinion without having any information,” Pospisil told TSN.

“I think that might be the case with Nick. To be honest, he is in no position to express an opinion when he just hears about this for the first time and has done zero due diligence. There are some guys like that and I’d have no problem telling him that to his face.”

One of Pospisil’s main goals is to help lower ranked players earn more money. The 29-year-old has accrued nearly $6 million in prize money alone throughout his career. He’s also not one to shy away from conflict. He is confident in his beliefs and stands by his principles. It’s important to note that there is no financial incentive whatsoever to being a player council member.

“There’s no agenda other than trying to look out for the players,” Pospisil said.

Paul Annacone understands the struggle. “Back in the dark ages I was on the council for a number of years and also the board, so I’ve lived in your shoes,” Annacone said.

“The one good thing for me is that I didn’t have to do it during the age of social media.”

“Tell me about it,” a smiling Pospisil responded.