Paula Badosa not sure if she'll be allowed to play the Australian Open

Paula Badosa not sure if she'll be allowed to play the Australian Open

"I feel abandoned because I don't have training equipment which I requested five days ago, and they have not informed me of the type of virus I have got. No information from the tournament." the frustrated Spaniard said.

Spain's Paula Badosa is still unsure whether she'll get to play the Australian Open, saying she hasn't been told when she can stop isolating.

The 23-year-old and her coach tested positive for coronavirus a week ago while in quarantine in a Melbourne hotel, and have been transferred to another facility.

"I'm feeling quite tired, but my symptoms are a lot better," she told Marca. "But today I could not sleep from anxiety and claustrophobia."

Badosa explained that the length of the required isolation is longer for those found to have a variant.

"Since I was transferred, I have not had any more tests," she said. "I also called asking which type of the virus I have, because it has been six days and they should know. It is depending on that that I have five days or nine days more of isolation."

The Australian Open starts in two weeks, and Badosa finds it unlikely she will play the tournament unless she can stop isolating in five days. She does not plan to play any of the warm-up tournaments regardless.

"If I can leave [then], I'll have a week to get into shape. If not, it won't be possible to recover in time for the tournament," she said.


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She has had a call from Australian Open tournament director Craig Tiley, but said there had been little other communication.

"I feel abandoned because I don't have training equipment which I requested five days ago, and they have not informed me of the type of virus I have got," said Badosa. "No information from the tournament."

She is particularly concerned about her fitness levels, saying that the hotels were suitable for someone who works "in an office and doesn't have physical requirements" but not competitive sports.  

"It's far and away the worst experience of my career," she said. "The conditions here are unfortunate, I wasn't expecting that.

"The No. 1 thing people recommend when you have the virus is to open the windows to let air in. I have no windows and my room, it's barely 15 square metres."

Badosa is the only player who has tested positive so far. But she was among at least 72 players placed in strict quarantine upon arrival in Melbourne.

The Australian Open safety protocols are based on the requirements of Victoria government officials.