Federer: Hawk-Eye detracts from sport

by: Matt Cronin | March 03, 2012

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Never a fan of Hawk-Eye, Roger Federer says that line-calling system makes the sport less interesting

"What I like without Hawk-Eye is just the players challenging the umpires more often,” he told reporters in Dubai. "The umpires had to be very aware. People today don't lose any energy over arguing with umpires any more, which back in the day we used to. I think also their mental strength came into play more often. Now you just move from point to point to point so you don't see that much character any more. That's kind of what I miss, because I just felt it was going to even out eventually throughout your career with all the good and bad calls. But I get the point of Hawk-Eye."

Federer also added that fans are missing out on the days when players and umpires and linespeople would battle over the legitimacy of calls.

"I think some fans who have never seen Hawk-Eye think it's amazing to see how accurate or inaccurate, whatever, it can be. I mean, I believe it's pretty accurate," Federer said, reportedly with irony. "So I see fans liking that, but then those are maybe the ones who don't remember the arguments back in the day with the umpires, which was when the booing starting, fans getting behind you or against you. Those were the good days, sometimes. I mean, you can still do it, but for what reason?"
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