Mental improvement, hard work paying off for Bogota winner Anisimova

Mental improvement, hard work paying off for Bogota winner Anisimova

"I really worked a lot on the mental part, in the sense not to get affected by anything that can happen and the consistency of playing several tournaments to get to know various people, tournaments."

Winning her first WTA title was an important achievement for Amanda Anisimova, but also a step to bigger things.

The 17-year-old won the WTA event at Bogota, coming from a set and a break down to lift the title.

A former top junior, Anisimova has climbed rapidly since she began playing on tour, reaching the top 100 in 2018 despite being sidelined for part of the season with a foot injury. Winning in Bogota now takes her up from No. 74 to a career-high No. 54 ranking.

She began this season by reaching the fourth round of the Australian Open. In addition to improving physically, Anisimova says her composure has been a big part of her recent success.


 
"I really worked a lot on the mental part, in the sense not to get affected by anything that can happen and the consistency of playing several tournaments to get to know various people, tournaments," she told a Columbian newspaper. "All this experience little by little will help me with climbing up."

Anisimova is among a talented cluster of American teens moving up the WTA ranks, crediting the influence of the Williams sisters on the game. But they have also established high standards.

"Hard work is necessary to achieve the level required by the sport and the country," she said. "There is more competition, to the point where we have many players at a high level."

Anisimova was among a pair of 17-year-olds competing for a title at the week's WTA events, with Iga Swiatek also playing the final of Lugano.